2019 Headliners


Gaelic Storm

Gaelic Storm

Performing at the Colorado Irish Festival | Sunday, July 14th

Still going after 20 years.  Gaelic Storm attributes their continued success to their fanatic audience, and it’s a well-diversified crowd for sure. The country-music folks adore the storytelling, the bluegrass-heads love the instrumentals, Celtic fans love their devotion to tradition, and the rockers simply relish the passion they play their instruments with.  Each band member, in their own way, expresses a deep gratitude for their fans, but it’s best summed up in the words of Patrick Murphy:  “The fans are the ones that have given us this life. We’re here for them.””


Jigjam

Jigjam

Performing at the Colorado Irish Festival | All three days, Friday – Sunday, July 12th-14th

They Are Back!  Jigjam Band members hail from County Offaly and County Tipperary in Ireland. Jigjam is on the crest of a wave that is sweeping through the Irish music world.  The ever-evolving genre of Irish folk music has generated yet one more definition – it’s Celtgrass – a combination of Celtic and Americana music. This great combination of sounds is infectious, mixing tradition with originality.  Their songs are varied, ranging from Old Crow Medicine’s Show’s contemporary “Levi” to more traditional Americana such as “Rye Whiskey” and “Jack of the Woods.” They also tackle classics such as Richard Thompson’s “Beeswing” and the modern favorite “Riptide” by the Australian songwriter Vance Joy.  Their sound is full of great vocal harmonies, guitar, banjo, mandolin and double bass. It’s nearly impossible to not want to dance to Jigjam’s music. Their talent is unquestioned. As one reviewer wrote, “Here’s an Irish band that’s going to impact the world as hard as Clancy Brothers or U2 if they get only half a chance.”


Scythian

Scythian

Performing at the Colorado Irish Festival | Saturday & Sunday, July 13th – 14th

Named after Ukrainian nomads, Scythian (sith-ee-yin) plays roots music from Celtic, Eastern European and Appalachian traditions with thunderous energy, technical prowess, and storytelling songwriting, beckoning crowds into a barn-dance, rock concert experience. Nashville’s Music City Roots says Scythian is ‘what happens when rock star charisma meets Celtic dervish fiddling’, and the Washington Post says “Scythian’s enthusiasm is contagious, and shows seem to end with everyone dancing, jumping around or hoisting glasses.”


The Young Dubliners

The Young Dubliners

Performing at the Colorado Irish Festival | Friday – July 12th

Although the Young Dubliners sound is most commonly called ‘Celtic Rock’, that label, as labels can often be, is misleading. The Irish influence is there, certainly, but it’s not the only influence that rears its head on their albums, or in live shows. After all, several of the band members have no Irish roots of any kind. “That was always the idea”, explains Keith Roberts (Lead singer and acoustic guitarist). “The sound was always intended to be a hybrid because we all come from different backgrounds. Even though two of us are from Ireland, a lot of the music we listened to growing up wasn’t Irish at all, but when we got here, we got homesick and developed a new appreciation for Irish Music. In truth the Celtic riffs can just as easily come from the American band members. Everyone writes now so you never know what you’ll end up with”

More Bands Announced Soon!